Travel Diary: Seattle Day 4 - Museum of Pop Culture (Part 2)

January 18, 2016 (continued): Making my way throughout the museum, I ended up in the "Fantasy: Worlds of Myth and Magic" exhibition (still currently available). The kid in me was a bit too excited to see many of my favorite childhood films represented there, I didn't realize how much of a fantasy buff I was.

The exhibition room is decked out with a large holographic tree house, dragon and dungeon so you're automatically transported into another world, which I thought was a fun touch.

For this post, I thought I'd do something a little different in that I'll discuss why the films featured here are some of my favorites and the lessons you can learn from them.

Wizard of Oz - The film no doubt tickles the visual senses yet the messages behind it's story are what makes it most powerful. Like life, Dorothy had to go through a lot of trials and tribulations in her journey on the Yellow Brick Road, and through those challenges she realized she "always had the power" to achieve what she wanted. Without going through life's lessons would we know what we're capable of? Everything's for a purpose. The "no place like home" aspect also resonates with me, in that she wished so much to be transported to another place, somewhere different and exciting and she got it, (in technicolor!). Yet, she found it wasn't what she expected and what made her happy was what she had at "home", that you should appreciate what you already have in front of you.

The Princess Bride - I feel this is a pretty universal film, in that most people of all ages and genders list it as one of their favorites. It's fun, adventurous and doesn't take itself too seriously. I think the the message behind this one is, while possibly cliche is that love conquers all. There's romantic love, Wesley and Princess Buttercup reuniting after all those years, and his love for her helped him through literal torture. There's familial love, where Inigo Montoya vowed to get revenge on the person who killed his father. Even where Fezzik and Inigo were kidnapping the Princess, they saw the love the protagonists had for each other that they ended up helping them.

Labyrinth - I used to watch the Labyrinth religiously as a kid, something about all the different elements she encountered was fun, and the contact juggling in the beginning always used to always fascinate me. The message at the end is something that still sticks with me to this day, where the heroine confronts Jareth and says, "You have no power over me". Like Dorothy in Wizard of Oz, she must go through a series of challenges to get to what she wants, but then realizes that she held the power all along. We put so much stock into what other people think about us that we let it control our lives, from how we dress, to career choices, and beyond. When we finally see that we gave them that power and take it back for ourselves, the barriers disappear and receive our lives back.


Stay tuned for Part 3 of my visit to the Museum of Pop Culture!


All pictures are taken by me and opinions are my own.