Travel Diary: San Francisco Day 4 (Part 2) - Lombard St, The Presidio, and Lucasfilm

January 22, 2016 (continued): To get from Chinatown to Lombard St, I rode on my first San Francisco tram. It was a slightly traumatic experience, because the seats were already crammed and I had my big gear bag and heavy winter coat so I was trying to sit down but the tram had already started moving. That coupled with the steps slick with rain I slipped and almost fell out, but luckily the other passengers reacted quickly and held onto my arms while I grabbed onto the bar.

After composing myself from nearly having my life flash before my eyes, I got off at my next stop. There were already a few people gathered taking selfies on the top of Lombard St and it’s winding road. It was a cool bucket list thing to see, but am glad it was on my way to other destinations because it is not as big as you expect it to be and not sure if I came here specifically it would be worth my while. It was interesting to see how the cars would have to carefully swerve each tight corner, especially with the wet roads.

After all the walking I was getting a bit weary and peckish, so I stopped for a little lunch and relaxation. I googled nearby spots, and an Indian restaurant, Curry Leaf came up - it sounded like the perfect place, as I was craving something warming to eat. Also having lived in Hawaii for a while, I had missed a lot of the good Indian restaurants I grew up eating while in New Zealand.

Along the way there were a couple more cool street art murals as well as an interestingly named theater.

At the Curry Leaf, I ordered the butter chicken with jasmine rice and a garlic naan bread. It was the perfect antidote to the mixture of cold, wet, and hungry attitude I was feeling, and it hit the spot. The portion could have probably fed two people!

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To work off my huge lunch, I walked towards The Presidio, a former military outpost that was now part of the Golden Gate Park filled with tons of trails, museums, mini parks, and my next destination, Lucasfilm. I’d read during my research that tourists can come by and visit the lobby area where many of the iconic characters are displayed.

Outside Lucasfilm was a fountain with statue of Yoda, there is kind of a special, funny meaning to him for me personally. As a baby, I was nicknamed Yoda, because when my dad first saw me when I was born, I apparently resembled the wrinkly little alien. Hopefully I wasn’t as green as he was! 

Inside the lobby, there were many costumes and statues of all the iconic Star Wars characters, a storm trooper, Boba Fett, and of course Darth Vader himself. Also displayed were many of the awards the company had won. Personally, I would have been excited to see something from my favorite of the Lucasfilm franchises Indiana Jones, but it was a cool experience nonetheless.

Later, I explored a little more around the park - it was so expansive you could almost get lost! It even had its own Starbucks there! Again, I would have loved to walk around more but the rain was picking up and I wanted to get to my other sights to see!

Travel Diary: San Francisco Day 2 (Part 3) - de Young Museum

January 20, 2016 (continued): Inspired by the arts and culture I witnessed at Haight-Ashbury, I ventured to Golden Gate Park where I visited the de Young Museum. Tip: They offer same day admission to the nearby Legion of Honor, to which I took full advantage of because I love me a deal.

De Young has a nice mix of classic and modern art with a range of sculptures scattered about their outdoor area and around Golden Gate Park. See below for my main highlights.

Beethoven’s Fur Elise was one of the first pieces I learned during my piano years from ages 8 - 13, so the replica of the original monument (in Central Park) by Henry Baerer caught my eye.

The Spreckels Temple of Music designed by the Reid Brothers was another favorite since it reminded me of the classic architecture I saw when I visited Rome many years ago.

First view of the de Young Museum welcomed to me by the Roman Gladiator statue by Guillaume Geefs.

The Untitled (Three Dancing Figures) sculpture by Keith Haring located in front of the museum was a favorite not only because of it's color and because Haring is an icon, but the figures also looked like they were replicating some Taekwon-Do moves (which I was a black belt in back in the day.)

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Located at the entrance to the Museum was the Drawn Stone by Andy Goldsworthy, an artist I chose to study for sculpture in high school art class. I loved his use of using natural materials and incorporating the surrounding environment as part of the art. This piece was no different as the cracks in the pavement followed the cracks in the stones. 

Fruit Still Life by Flora C. Mace and Joey Kirkpatrick - I always enjoy novelty size things whether miniature or oversize so this piece definitely ticked the box!

I love the colors in this woven piece, juxtaposing new and old world.

It was cool seeing another Chihuly piece after visiting the museum in Seattle.

I enjoyed this trompe l'oeil-esque chair as it kind of reminded me of my other favorite surrealist, De Chirico.

My inner magpie was definitely attracted to this Nick Cave soundsuit, bejeweled in beads and sequins.

David Hockney had a series of his works on display he created with an iPad. These were some of my favorites because I loved that established artists are into exploring new mediums and what they can do with it.

I love the colorways of the next set of pieces.

This room had a nice view of the courtyard out front.

It was great coming across pieces from my old homeland, New Zealand - interpretations of the Maori cloak, Kakahu. This piece was by Te Rongo Kirkwood in collaboration with Judy Robson-Deane.

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A classic Tiffany lamp.

A life imitating art moment of moi in front of Tulip Culture by George Hitchcock.

Hello Dali!

Seeing a Picasso with my own eyes.

Dropping my next mixtape at the Pool of Enchantment.

The sculpture garden with one of my favorites, the Corridor Safety Pin sculpture by Clase Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen.