Travel Diary: Los Angeles Day 4 - The Getty Museum

January 26, 2016 (continued): On my last day of this trip, I had some time to before my flight back to Hawaii so I decided to check out the iconic Getty Museum.

I decided to indulge in a “hearty” (a.k.a. fat-fueled) meal. Doughboys Cafe & Bakery (now closed), was nearby my AirBnB and looked like it had interesting items on the menu. I ordered the Southern Corn Pudding Special which consisted of half creamy cheesy corn pudding, half pulled pork with grilled onions, corn and potatoes, topped with two griddled fried eggs and broiled in a cast iron skillet. It sounded delicious but I was a little disappointed as it was surprisingly bland and underseasoned for all the richness. I also ordered a mocha and chocolate chip cookie because I had seen they sold cookies the size of people’s faces and I’m all for novelty.

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After finishing my breakfast I immediately made my way to the museum since I was flying out in the afternoon and wanted to have time to explore. Even though I had a few hours there, it was so expansive that I didn’t get to see everything thoroughly, so I recommend giving yourself at least half a day to explore if you are an art aficionado.

The museum is free admission but if you are driving (which I was), the parking fee is a flat $15. I believe you can get a same day deal if you’re also visiting the Getty Villa. To get to the museum, you have to take a tram ride up to the top, it’s a great way to see views overlooking LA.

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Upon arrival you are immediately greeted by the museum’s undulating architecture designed by Richard Meier, it is somewhat reminiscent to me of a swimming pool for some reason.

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As you venture through the main building and head outside you can see expansive views of LA.

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There were many artifacts on display but I only captured a few that piqued my interest, partly because I was a little photo fatigued from the trip and also wanted to be more in the moment when observing the collections.

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One of the highlights for me personally was seeing many of the illuminated manuscripts they had in their collection. It’s always gratifying to see something in real life which you learned about only through books, as this was for me when I was in college. I love how the colors and gilding of each page was still vibrant to this day, and seeing the amount of detail that went into each page.

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This painting of Madonna and Child with Two Hermit Saints by Bernardino Fungai made me chuckle a little because of the child’s expression and posture like he’s saying “Guurrrl, chill...”

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More views from outside.

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I love the playfulness of the trompe l'oeil technique so this Musical Group on a Balcony painting on the ceiling by Gerrit van Honthorst was a fun piece to see.

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Other painted details.

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Portrait of Louis XIV by Hyancinthe Rigaud.

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There were many pieces of furniture dating from the late 1700s. Elaborately ornate details, inlays, gildings, and embroidered materials fit for a king (or queen!).

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I headed outside where I saw different views of LA’s landscape, more of the museum’s architecture, and the desert gardens.

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The Central Garden had a maze like feature as its main centerpiece. Since it was winter at the time, the flora and fauna was a little barren but it was still stunning nonetheless.

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There were still many areas I had yet to explore but I had a flight to catch. This was a fantastic way to wrap up an amazing trip.

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Travel Diary: Los Angeles Day 3 (Part 2) - DTLA and The Last Bookstore

January 25, 2016 (continued): The next place I wanted to check out was The Last Bookstore which was in walking distance from Grand Central Market.

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On my way there, I spotted another cool electrical box with the Egyptian God Anubis, painted in a way that reminds me of Sanna Annukka’s scandinavian style animals.

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I passed through the Historic Core of DTLA with many beautiful buildings having an architectural style dating back to the early 1900s.

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Upon entering the store, I could see why this was a highly recommended place to visit as it was part art installation/gallery, part bookstore. There were sculptural pieces made of books everywhere in the main room, including the checkout bar station.

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When coming from the front the room to the left is the art/design books section, so of course it had to be filled with little bits of artistic expression. On the walls were these beautiful, largely detailed pencil(?) drawing murals. The back of the room had a large gallery of paintings in different styles, from thrift store chic to modern, contemporary works.

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Even the stairway area had little bits of art thrown in, albeit a bit creepy, even more so when I was editing this image and noticed reflected in the security mirror, that there was a person standing in the stairwell.

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Hanging above the stairs was a gothic-esque sculpture.

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Further up was an art installation reminiscent of something out of Harry Potter, where the books come alive appear to be “flying” out of the bookcase.

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Part of the upstairs has a few mini shops selling cool vintage trinkets, to paintings, to stationery bits and bobs.

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Once you reach the end of the loop of mini shops, there is an entrance to the upstairs part of the bookstore. Here, are even more sculptural book wonders, from little windows, to a lit up cave.

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Also sprinkled throughout are more artsy influenced installations including 3D murals, color categorized bookshelves and various vintage sculptures.

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Their inventory of books is a mixture of new, and secondhand with a few hard to find thrown in. I would recommend visiting whether you’re a bibliophile or quirky art connoisseur!

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On the way back to my car, I spotted a few more representations of DTLA’s eclectic mix of artistic inspiration like this pretty black and white building.

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To the *ahem* creepy.

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To the amusing.

Weekly Update: LA - Craft and Folk Art Museum

Been busy, busy - it’s the 2nd week in on my weekly update and already late and didn’t document much of it. Oops!

October 15: I did manage to go to the Craft and Folk Art Museum on Sunday and it was a pay what you can day as opposed to the normal $7 admission. I guess the whole museum consists of one main exhibition that changes every so often, this time it was art regarding The U.S.-Mexico Border: Place, Imagination, and Possibility.

The museum had some interesting and thought-provoking pieces, one of my favorites being Cartonlandia by Ana Serrano which was a sculptural collage created from recycled materials including postcards and cereal boxes to illustrate the slums scattered around Latin America.

This is a very small museum with only a couple floors and while I think supporting art is important, I’d probably recommend going on a Sunday where you pay what you can - as there are a few other free museums with the same amount of pieces available. But you can decide for yourself as you can see below some of my favorite pieces that I saw there.

After the museum I went for a walk around the neighborhood and captured some shapes and street art that caught my eye as I went by.

Travel Diary: San Francisco Day 5 - Mission District & Clarion Alley Murals Super Post

January 23, 2016 (continued): My mission (no pun intended) was to make it out to the artsy Mission District for my last day in San Francisco. In the morning, I caught the BART and headed over there. Emerging from the station, I definitely felt the shift in the type of environment than where I spent most of my time in SF. I wanted to try breakfast in that area since I’ve heard of a lot of good, new, restaurants that opened up. Walking around, I immediately saw that it wasn’t going to be an easy feat getting in for a quick bite anywhere, I couldn’t even fit the whole line in the picture!

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I was going to post a huge long rant about my less than stellar experience at Mission Beach Cafe for breakfast, but I’d rather not tarnish this post while there is the awesomeness of the murals coming up. Lets just say that while researching their site for this post, a disclaimer on Yelp popped up that said that this restaurant is in the bottom 5% sanitation wise. That pretty much encapsulated my time there, and it looks like they haven't really improved since I was there a year ago!

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Following my breakfast it left a pretty bad taste literally and figuratively, but it was washed away when I stopped by the Clarion Alley Murals. It was an explosion of color, intricately painted murals, political messages, and a few <ahem> interesting sculptures. The following super post were all taken on my iPhone, I didn't want to lug around my big camera so apologies for the quality.

Also found in the alley, it looked like a musician wasn’t too happy with his latest songwriting attempts perhaps?

After spending the majority of my time in the alley, I explored more of the district and visited a few shops I had heard about including The Pirate Store. It is what the name suggests, selling pirate / fantasy themed items, but it also had a lot of cool, interactive elements like a mini museum where you pull the rope and something comes down or you can look in the drawers for different specimens etc.

There were many more murals dotted around the district, a green lady, plus those multi-colored Victorian houses that’s so iconic to San Francisco that I love so much. I loved that even their tree grate had a Dia De Los Muertos theme.

Visiting the Mission District was definitely an experience, and was a fusion of new and old coming together in an eclectic mix. If you’re artistically inclined, I do recommend stopping by, as there is a lot to absorb creatively in many forms.

I headed back to downtown to grab my things and ventured to the airport to my final leg of the tour, LA. At the SFO airport was a stunning sunset that emerged after the rain and it was the perfect bittersweet goodbye to one of my new favorite cities.

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Travel Diary: San Francisco Day 2 (Part 4) - Legion of Honor

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January 20, 2016 (continued): Taking advantage of my same day, dual admission from the de Young Museum, I caught the bus and headed towards the Legion of Honor - a fine arts museum located near Lands End. I wanted to visit this place because I read that it was one of the locations used in Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo, and I have an affinity for Roman style architecture (even though it is a replica of a French building!).

The exterior of the museum is quite stunning in person, the pictures don’t do it justice. In front, it is flanked by two lion statues and a few sculptures scattered about, including in the parking lot. In the distance next to it, I could see glimpses of the iconic Golden Gate Bridge peeking through the cluster of trees and fog (my first sighting!). The long stretches of the column-lined hallways on the outside created a feeling of elegance.

Below are some of my personal highlights, although it was quite a large museum and it was getting late in the day, so I only caught glimpses of a few exhibitions.

While I would love to have come up with something philosophical when seeing this painting, Samson and the Honeycomb by Guercino - my mind immediately went to those classical art memes. What do you think of my attempt?

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It was cool to see they had a gallery full of Rodin sculptures.

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I toured the restored Salon Doré designed during Louis XVI’s reign for the reception room of the Hôtel de La Trémoille. The grandeur of the gilded panelings and richly upholstered furniture transported you to a time of extravagance and luxury.

I’m no stranger to admiring the constellations and the zodiac, so this antique globe featuring a map of these was another favorite.

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Even though I strongly dislike insects, this study - Peapods and Insects by Jan Van Kessel caught my eye. I was fascinated by the minuscule details of the painting that took me back to art class in school where I would make myself go blind by painting with those one-haired brushes.

The detail in this sculpture is unreal, especially when you see it’s size. I liked how the sculptor managed to capture the emotion and action, that makes you feel like the snake could strike at any second.

A serendipitous moment I happened to snap, while trying to be artsy by framing the Monet painting with the doorways. It amuses me how it looks like the sculpture head is peering over trying to perve on the person nearby.

Ever since I was a kid, I had a love of fantasy and mythical creatures so this painting, Fairies in a Bird’s Nest by John Anster Fitzgerald was definitely a favorite. The darker tone of the fairies in his work gave it an interesting twist to the otherwise glittery portrayal that’s so popular these days.

Taking a moment to observe.

A close-up study of Renoir’s Landscape at Beaulieu. The colors and movement of the strokes give the painting such life!

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Still Life by a young up and comer you might have heard of, Vincent Van Gogh.

Moi, wanting to get up close and personal with Claude Monet’s Water Lilies. There’s nothing like getting near one of the most iconic pieces of art - seeing the ridges of the brushstrokes and smelling the paint. One of my dreams is to visit his home in Giverny, you can still see the garden where he drew inspiration from for his most famous paintings.

I had reached the end of one of the exhibitions and there were locked glass doors leading out to the courtyard, the sun was setting and had lit the sculpture and trees in the most beautiful golden glow.

I was a little obsessed with framing the art in doorways. Couldn’t help but capture this moment as I was making my way out.

I may or may not have been a little excited to see a cast of Rodin’s The Thinker statue in the middle of the courtyard and taken a few ridiculous selfies in front of.

The carving detail under the archway was beautiful and transported me back to Rome.

A couple more sculptures outside the museum.

The sun was setting and I saw a few people heading down a pathway nearby so I thought I’d check it out before I left. I’m glad I did because I got a straight shot of the sunset over the rolling hills of the Land’s End trail. To the right, I spotted the Golden Gate Bridge framed by the tops of the trees, it was a perfect end to my day here.

Catching several buses and walking back to the hotel, I got to see more of the whimsically colored homes and magical little alleyways of San Francisco.

For dinner I went to Super Duper Burgers which I’d heard good things about. I just got a regular cheeseburger, garlic fries, and a chocolate shake. To be honest I was a little disappointed, it was an ok meal and a little soggy. I’d still give them a second chance, maybe it was an off night?


I decided to wash it all down with a delicious horchata boba tea from the Boba Guys to cap off the night (I know, a real party animal).

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Travel Diary: Seattle Day 4 - Chihuly Glass & Garden

January 18, 2016 (continued): My next stop was something that’s been on my bucket list for a while, and luckily the Chihuly Garden & Glass was right next door to the Space Needle!

My introduction to the works of Dale Chihuly was originally coming across pictures of the stunning glass ceilings that he created for the Bellagio Casino in Vegas. He’s originally from Washington so what better than to see his works in his hometown.

The explosion of color throughout the gallery was akin to a Charlie and the Chocolate Factory moment, where the glass sculptures reminded me of giant candy ready to be picked! Of course it is sort of daunting going throughout there since everything is so delicately put together that one small move and it could all come crashing down! How they sculpted the pieces of blown glass to fit so intricately together like a puzzle is amazing, especially when seeing it in real life. Even though the pictures don’t do his work justice, see below for some of my favorite pieces from my time there.